Merry Christmas !!

Merry Christmas to you and yours;

May you experience genuine peace  … despite your circumstances … this Christmas and all through the new year as you begin to truly realize God’s amazing love shown through his son, Jesus.

A Taste of Italy Art Exhibit

Roxy Poster

 

My Exhibit includes photos while on my first “Chasing Francis” Spirit Venture in 2012 with photos from Assisi, Rome and Florence. It is at the RoxyAnn Winery in Medford, Oregon.  Come on by for a glass of Cabernet Franc:)

If you are interested in joining us we will be going again next spring during the last couple of weeks in March.   Pax et Bonum

The Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi

Upper level of Basilica with Equestrian statue of St FrancisThe Basilica di San Francesco is a distinctive landmark that can be seen from miles away as you approach Assisi.  As you draw nearer you can appreciate the huge supporting arcades.  The Basilica of St. Francis is considered one of the artistic highlights of medieval Europe, as well as one of the most important places of Christian pilgrimage in the world.  It is definitely a ‘must see’ while visiting or on pilgrimage as it continues to be a powerful place both for believers and art-lovers alike.  The basilica is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Order of Friars Minor more commonly known as the Franciscan Order.

The Basilica of St Francis, early dawnBrother Francis died in October of 1226 and less than two years later his disciple and fellow-worker Brother Elias (of Cortona) had plans underway for construction of a church in his honor.  The Friars Minor, Pope Gregory IX (who, as a cardinal, enjoyed a close friendship with Francis), and the people of Assisi were all involved in supporting the early construction of what became an incongruously grandiose and beautifully embellished memorial to a profoundly converse man who preached and lived a simple life of poverty, abstinence, and renunciation of worldly goods in search of a greater spirituality.

It is believed that Brother Elias, although devout, was more worldly that Francis, and the popularity of the Franciscan order through the ages owes a great deal to Elias’ marketing skills.

Side-hill view of Basilica St Francis, AssisiConstruction began in 1228.  The basilica was built into the side of a hill and actually consists of two churches known as the Upper Church and Lower Church, and the saint’s tomb which is yet below the Lower Church.  A site for the church was donated to Pope Gregory by Simone di Pucciarello on the western tip of Asio hill outside the Assisi city walls on what was known as the “Hill of Hell” where criminals were put to death.  It is now called the “Hill of Paradise”.

Francis was declared a saint on July 16, 1228 and the following day the pope laid the first stone of the Church of St. Francis.  The Lower Church was quickly finished by 1230, and on Pentecost May 25, 1230 the body of St. Francis was taken from its temporary burial place St. George, now the Basilica of Saint Clare of Assisi, to the Lower Church (or Lower Basilica).  The actual burial place was hidden in the earth beneath the high alter and sealed up with stone to protect St. Francis’ remains.  It was not till 1818 that the tomb of St. Francis was rediscovered beneath the high altar.  After being hidden for nearly 600 years the coffin was opened and Francis’ skeleton was found completely intact.  A new crypt was built first in neo-Classical style then later in a simpler neo-Romanesque style.  Thus modern pilgrims are able to approach the very tomb of St. Francis, which no medieval pilgrims were ever able to do.  (Notes from Sacred Destinations)

Construction was begun on the Upper Church in 1239 and completed in 1253.  Both churches were consecrated by Pope Innocent IV in 1253 and designated a Major Basilica in 1288.  On September 26, 1997 two earthquakes hit this region of Italy damaging many ancient buildings.  The Lower Church walls are nearly nine feet thick and were unscathed while the Upper Church with larger windows and walls only three feet thick were damaged.  An aftershock killed two Franciscan friars and two specialists while they were inspecting the damage to the Basilica.   Many of the frescoes of the life of St. Francis by Giotto in the Upper Church were destroyed in the collapse.  The basilica was closed for two years for restoration.

The Basilica of St Francis and lower piazza, early morning

The photo above shows the lower piazza and the side entrance to the Lower Church in the early morning before the activity of the day.  The alternating striped colors of the street almost seem like an escalator drawing you toward the grand side entrance.

Portico-Colonade L piazza-Basilica St FrancisBelow, a pilgrim is enjoying a time of reflection in the quiet of the early morning under the arched colonnade lining the sides of the Piazza Inferiore.  The colonnades were added in the 15th century.

Under the colonade of the lower piazza of the Basilica of St Francis of AssisiAn example of more recent artwork under the colonnade of the lower piazza.

Portico Art-Basilica St Francis

By mid day the piazza becomes a hub of activity with tourists and pilgrims.  Here are a couple of young art students on an “art venture”.

Young artists on the piazza of the Basilica of St Francis of Assisi

The side entrance to the Basilica of St Francis of Assisi from the lower piazzaThis is the grand side entrance to the Lower Church showing the stairway to the Upper Piazza and Upper Church and the benediction loggia on the left side of the facade and supporting curtain wall which was added in 1754.

Benediction Loggia, Bassilica, St Francis, Assisi

the pediment over the side entrance to the Basilica of St Francis of AssisiAbove the doors is an ornate pediment containing a large rose window, flanked by two smaller ones, called by some “the eye of the most beautiful church in the world.”

Rose detail-Side entrance Basilica

Pediment detail-Side entr Basilica St FrancisWooden decorations on the doors by Ugolinuccio da Gubbio done circa 1550.

Wood panel-door-Basilica Sr Francis AssisiThe upper piazza joining the lower of the Basilica of St FrancisThe Umbian view from the upper piazza of the Basilica of St FrancisSince the Basilica is located on the far western end of the hill it offers wonderful views overlooking the valley below.

The view from upper entrance of the Basilica of St FrancisThis is the view from the portico of the Upper Church showing the Franciscan Tau, PAX, and the equestrian statue of St. Francis.

Front entrance to the Upper Basilica of St Francis of AssisiThe Upper Church has white-washed brick facade and a Gothic doorway with a Romanesque rose window.

Detail of front Rose to Basilica St FrancisUpper level of Basilica with Equestrian statue of St FrancisSt Francis-Equestrian statue; b&wThis equestrian statue is one of my favorites showing Francis with his head hung low as he slinks back home after God has told him to “let go” of his dream of becoming a heroic “knight in shining armor” and to instead follow the way of Jesus.Bell tower  Campanile of Basilica St Francis of AssisiAs much as the outside architecture of the basilica is interesting and beautiful, the inside of the basilica is even more so.  It is frescoed from top to bottom by the leading artists of the day with works from Cimabue, Giotto, Simone Martini, and Pietro Lorenzetti.  Unfortunately photography was not permitted inside.  But taking time to experience the inside will convince you that it is as spectacular as the Vatican or St. Peter’s Cathedral in a simpler beauty.  Basilica tower w valley viewDiscovery Venture Tours has scheduled another Spirit Venture – “Chasing Francis” next year from March 19th to the 29th.  We will be spending 6 nights in Assisi and 4 nights in Rome.  Below is the brochure.    It was such an amazing experience many of us are going back.  Let us know if you are interested in joining us.

2014-9x12 Assisi Broch. inside-ProPhotoRGB-8 bit-350dpi-Edit2014-9x12 Assisi Brochure-outer

(Notes from Rick Steves, Sacred Destinations, and Wikipedia)

The Cathedral of Assisi

The Chiesa di San Rufino is the Duomo or the Cathedral of Assisi.  The cathedral is the seat of the local bishop.  Rufino was Assisi’s first bishop, it’s Patron Saint, and was martyred and buried here in the third century.  It was inspirational to be in the same church where St. Francis and St. Clare were baptized.  It was also the bishop blessed Francis’ “spiritual awakening.”  It is still the official baptismal site for the village of Assisi.

The Romanesque facade is believed to have been completed in the early 13th century.  The interior is Neoclassical.  It was beautifully restored after a 1997 earthquake.

The facade is divided vertically into three sections and horizontally into three stories with a row of blind arches between the the first two.  All three portals are richly sculpted with red marble relief in the lunettes and geometric designs and figures around the entries.

Two lions stand guard at the central portal, with one eating a Christian martyr and the other clutching a ram in its claws.

Over the central portal the red marble relief depicts Christ enthroned beneath the moon and a star, with the Madonna del Latte to the left and St. Rufinus to the right.

The central rosette shows symbols of the Evangelists surrounding the intricate rose which is supported by three extraordinary figures standing on unidentifiable animals.

As I entered the rear of the church my eyes were immediately drawn to the two fine statues of St. Francis and St. Clare by Giovanni Dupre in 1888.

artistically edited due to poor lighting to an ‘antique’ style

artistically edited due to poor lighting to an ‘antique’ style

The next attraction was actually the floor.  Large glass panels exposed parts of the ninth century foundation.  Apparently after the 1997 earthquake inspectors discovered graves under the paving stones.  It was a common practice to bury people in the churches.  I have seen this in ancient Scandinavian churches as well.  It is also likely that this church was built upon old Roman temple ruins.  A cistern is also visible from the rear of the church.  The Diocesan museum is underneath the church as part of the foundation of the early church of San Rufino where the saint’s sarcophagus and ancient art can be seen.

The floor also displayed large red marble reliefs, one with the Franciscan Tau and the other with “abba Father.”

The baptismal font has a black iron gate around it and a terracotta cover over it (installed in 1882).  It is here in the San Rufino that Francis was baptized circa 1181 and Clare was baptized in 1194.  Eighteen years later it was here that Clare heard Francis teach and decided to dedicate her life to following Jesus.  Emperor Frederick II is believed to have been baptized here in the early 1190s.

Above the entrance to the chapel to the right stands a fresco by Giovanni Andrea Carlone, The Sacrifice of Elijah.  It depicts the contest between the prophets of Baal and Elijah.  Each prepared to sacrifice a bull and called on God to light the fire.  Elijah’s prayer was answered the prophet of Baal was not.  The people consequently returned to the one and only true living God and killed the prophets who had attempted to lead them astray.

There is also a beautiful Processional banner from the early 16th century which is variously attributed to Berto de Giovanni or Dono Doni and was incorporated as the altarpiece of the  Altare di San Giuseppe in San Rufino in 1670.  It depicts St. Joseph showing the Virgin’s wedding ring to an audience of kneeling men and women with a landscape of Assisi behind.

The predella (the base of the alterpiece) contains three panels depicting the Holy Family with SS Antony of Padua (on the left) and Bernardino of Siena (on the right) by Dono Doni.

The slide show has photos of Pope John Paul II and of the rose window looking from the inside with filters to appreciate the detail.

As always, with any visit to an inspirational setting such as the Chiesa di San Rufino, all the photos in the world can not capture the “Holy Spirit’s” touch on my heart or soul when sitting in this cathedral … all alone … in absolute silence.  I can hear Him “calling me” … “Come follow me.”

I can only answer with the simple prayer … Here I am Lord.  Show me how.  I am willing.  Help me stay on your path.

Who do you say that I am?

Best laid plans …

My original intent was to post a photo everyday while in Assisi and Rome.  However that was not meant to be.  Perhaps it was for the best, though … since Father ‘does’ know best.  Not being able to ‘send’ from my MacBook enabled me to “let go” of the burden to blog daily and just take in the whole adventure and capture more in the camera.

Despite about 10 hours now of patient and expert help from the Apple team I am still not able to ‘send’ from my MacBook, but am remaining patient.  More help is on the way:)

I have been posting ‘Animoto’ shows on my Facebook page.  This is my first post here on “Franciscus Meus” since our fabulous ‘pilgrimage’ to Assisi.

This photo is a ‘close-up’ from a copy of the crucifix/cross that originally “spoke” to Francis in the church of San Damiano.  This copy is found in the Chiesa Nuova (New Church) built in 1615 and is located at the location of St. Francis’s home.

I can truly understand why Francis was moved by this cross of Jesus.  I blurred all but his face in this photo that you, too would be moved by his face.  As I study his eyes I sense a deep compassion and love, and a longing for me to let Him to be my “all that matters.”

He seems to be asking, “Who do you say that I am?”

Outside are two statues of his mother and father, holding the chains by which his father held him prisoner, attempting to hold him back from following Lady Poverty.  But his mother released him.  In this case mother knew best.

Inside the church you can view the dungeon where Francis was held prisoner.  There are beautiful paintings of early Franciscan themes.  There is a stairway that leads down to what used to be a workshop and now shows a copy of the crucifix, some excellent art of St. Francis and St. Clare and a wonderful stained glass window.  It is indeed a perfect place to spend some time with the One who yearns to be my “all that matters.”

Keeping Watch

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“STAY  HERE  AND  KEEP  WATCH  WITH  ME.”

Jesus’ agony in the garden of Gethsemane

“Jesus went with his disciples to a place called Gethsemane, and he said to them, “Sit here while I go over there and pray.”  He took Peter and the two sons of Zebedee along with him, and he began to be sorrowful and troubled.  Then he said to them, “My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death.  Stay here and keep watch with me.”

Going a little farther, he fell with his face to the ground and prayed, “My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me.  Yet not as I will, but as you will.”

Then he returned to his disciples and found them sleeping.  “Could you men not keep watch with me for one hour?”  he asked Peter.  “Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation.  The spirit is willing, but the body is weak.”

He went away a second time and prayed, “My Father, if it is not possible for this cup to be taken away unless I drink it, may your will be done.”

When he came back, he again found them sleeping, because their eyes were heavy.  So he left them and went away once more and prayed the third time, saying the same thing.  Then he returned to the disciples and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and resting?  Look, the hour is near, and the Son of Man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.  Rise, let us go!  Here comes my betrayer.”    (Matthew 26: 36-45)

This passage has always been a sobering one to me.  I can so easily identify with the disciples.  “The Spirit is willing, but the body is weak.”  If ever there was an area in my spiritual life that needed improvement this is it.  Becoming like Francis and shirking all possessions, wealth, and position would in some ways make this process easier …. but what a price!   Certainly there must be a ‘middle road’ of sorts for a “post modern Christian” like myself.

As I embark on this ‘pilgrimage’ I am hoping that I will be able to balance the role of “photographer” and that of “pilgrim”.  I hope to find (perhaps I will need to “make”) time to spend in prayer and meditation.  I have set a goal of attempting spend all such time NOT thinking of ‘self’ but rather waiting in silence for what God puts on my heart.  This will likely be very difficult.

We ‘pilgrims’ that are “Chasing Francis” all desire to become more and more like Jesus as we follow him.   “Stay here and keep watch for us.”

Chasing Francis

“Chasing Francis is written in a genre called wisdom literature, which is a very delicate balance of fiction and nonfiction, pilgrimage and teaching.” Ian Morgan Cron wrote this very witty and engaging novel apparently after much research and gives credit to many authors whose writings or ideas influenced passages in his book.  There is a study guide at the end of the book to help us get the most from his book and he encourages us to get on line at www.chasingfrancis.com to learn more about Saint Francis.

“Chasing Francis is not a history or a spirituality book, though it contains elements of both.  It is a novel that touches a little something in the inner troubles of most of us who try to follow Jesus faithfully in a modern western environment.  Delightful!”

JOHN  MICHAEL  TALBOT, founder, spiritual father, and general minister, The Brothers and Sisters of Charity at Little Portion Hermitage

“By guiding us to wrestle deeply with a crisis of faith experience and by re-introducing us to a giant of faith, Ian Cron paves for us a path of grace, humility, and ultimate joy even through our “ground zero” darkness.  This is a life-changing work.  I now find myself “chasing Francis” in my life as well as in my art.”

MAKOTO  FUJIMURA, artist/writer, New York City

Having read Chasing Francis myself, I too feel that Ian touched on something that has been tugging on my heart.  There is a part of me that feels I have not been truly satisfying my thirst for God.  I desire to somehow make more of an impact in “my world” for my Jesus who gave his all for me.   Does “my world” see me as being different in any positive way or am I so much like the world that I am not making an impact?  How many of you upon introspection feel the same?

Introduction to Franciscus Meus

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“For I know the plans I have for you,”  declares the LORD

“plans to prosper you and not to harm you,

plans to give you hope and a future.”

   Jeremiah 29:11

 Welcome to  Franciscus Meus.

I did not really have any big plans for traveling this year.  But I believe God has opened a door that I cannot ignore.  A couple of weeks ago an incredible opportunity presented itself.  I met David Rapp of Water’s Edge Community Church and Discovery Venture Tours.   He has arranged a debut  Spirit Venture or ‘pilgrimage tour’ to Italy “CHASING FRANCIS:   Assisi, Rome, and more.”

David has been taking groups of youngsters and adults all over the world for many years.  He  designed this tour after the current popular novel, “Chasing Francis” by Ian Morgan Cron.

The package consists of 7 nights in Assisi and 3 in Rome and will include tours, excursions, historic pilgrimage sites, prayer, Eucharist celebrations, engaging discussions over great Italian food and wine, and as you can well imagine there will be nonstop great photo opportunities.

This is an invitation for you to join us and hop on this Spirit Venture to Italy from April 11th through the 21st.  We need more pilgrims.  There are still a few openings.  Unfortunately this is very short notice.  You only have 9 days to sign up.  David is hoping for a group of no more than 20.  Go to www.discoveryventuretours.com  and get all the information and the itinerary.

My blog on Chasing Francis is entitled Franciscus Meus, “My Francis,” and will include thoughts on Ian Cron’s book and interesting facts about Francis and eventually photos from the tour.  Come ‘pilgrim’ with me. Click here to read all my Franciscus Meus posts.